October 2012 Luncheon – Gordy Ringoen ’60

From 1900 to 1950 (the first fifty years of Sigma Tau) Gordy Ringoen ’60 reports that nearly one third of all Sigma Tau Fijis served in either the First or Second World Wars. From the vast collection of letters and Sigma Tau Service Letters (STSL’s) collected from these two wars, Gordy has compiled the stories of the veterans and their experiences.

Gordy Ringoen '60 holding "Veterans of Sigma Tau WWI and WWII"
Gordy Ringoen ’60 holding “Veterans of Sigma Tau WWI and WWII”

Graduating in the Class of 1960, Gordy went on to serve as an officer in the U.S. Army. Then he followed a path of varied business career and entrepreneurial activities in a variety of industries including computers, electronics, finance, radio, oil services, consulting, and investment management. In the past decade, Gordy has taught classes in Ethics and Management at the Foster Business School and guest lectured in Management, Marketing, Sales, and Finance. Today, Gordy describes himself with a bit of tongue-in-cheek as “Have been unemployed and unemployable for more than 15 years”.

Gordy authored two books for the benefit of our fraternity and Sigma Tau.

SIGMA TAU CHAPTER
OF
PHI GAMMA DELTA FRATERNITY
1900-1960

and

VETERANS OF SIGMA TAU
PHI GAMMA DELTA
WORLD WAR I AND WORLD WAR II

gordy pic

Gordy brings to his authoring activities a wide-ranging intellect complimented with deep business experiences that contribute much to everything that he tackles….including authoring histories of Sigma Tau. At the October luncheon, Gordy shared stories, because his observations about the two books are that beyond the facts, the “stories effect us”. Gordy’s comments focused on “What did they feel?” and “What did they think?”

A summary of Gordy’s comments: “It’s the story — not the weeks, the months, the years of war. The book “Veterans of Sigma Tau” offers the stories of Fiji veterans who answered our nation’s call. It’s their lives, their families back home, and their actions in their theaters of war.”

The luncheon was fortunate to have a table of 1946ers attending, so Gordy’s comments rang true as he discussed the history of the fraternity’s veterans.